Planet RDF

It's triples all the way down

April 20

AKSW Group - University of Leipzig: AKSW Colloquium, 20-04-2015, OWL/DL approaches to improve POS tagging

In this colloquium Markus Ackermann will touch on the ‘linguistic gap‘ of recent POS tagging endeavours (as perceived by C. Manning, [1]). Building on observations in that paper, potential paths towards more linguistically informed POS tagging are explored:

An alternative to the most widely employed ground truth for development and evaluation of POS tagging systems for English will be presented ([2]) and utilization of benefits of a DL-based representation of POS tags for a multi-tool tagging approach will be shown ([3]).

Finally, the presenter will give an overview about work in progress with the goal to combine OWL/DL-representation of POS tags with a suitable symbolic machine learning tool (DL-Learner, [4]) to improve the performance of a state-of-the-art statistical POS tagger with human-interpretable post-correction rules formulated as OWL/DL-expressions.

[1] Christopher D. Manning. 2011. Part-of-Speech Tagging from 97% to 100%: Is It Time for Some Linguistics? In Alexander Gelbukh (ed.), Computational Linguistics and Intelligent Text Processing, 12th International Conference, CICLing 2011, Proceedings, Part I. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 6608, pp. 171–189.

[2] G.R. Sampson. 1995. English for the Computer: The SUSANNE Corpus and Analytic Scheme. Clarendon Press (Oxford University Press).

[3] Christian Chiarcos. 2010. Towards Robust Multi-Tool Tagging: An OWL/DL-Based Approach. In Proceedings of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, ACL2010.

[4] Jens Lehmann. 2009. DL-Learner: Learning Concepts in Description Logics. In The Journal of Machine Learning Research, Volume 10, pp. 2639-2642.

Posted at 06:21

Ebiquity research group UMBC: Access control for a triplestore linked data fragments interface

In this week’s meeting (10-11am Tue, April 21), Ankur Padia will present work in progress on providing access control to an RDF triple store.

Triple store access control for a linked data fragments interface
Ankur Padia, UMBC

The maturation of Semantic Web standards and associated web-based data representations such as schema.org have made RDF a popular model for representing graph data and semi-structured knowledge. Triple stores are used to store and query an RDF dataset and often expose a SPARQL endpoint service on the Web for public access. Most existing SPARQL endpoints support very simple access control mechanisms if any at all, preventing their use for many applications where fine-grained privacy or data security is important. We describe new work on access control for a linked data fragments interface, i.e. one that accepts queries consisting one or more triple patterns and responds with all matching triples that the authenticated querier can access.

Posted at 03:03

April 18

Dave Beckett: Making Debian Docker Images Smaller

TL;DR:

  1. Use one RUN to prepare, configure, make, install and cleanup.
  2. Cleanup with: apt-get remove --purge -y $BUILD_PACKAGES $(apt-mark showauto) && rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/*

I've been packaging the nghttp2 HTTP/2.0 proxy and client by Tatsuhiro Tsujikawa in both Debian and with docker and noticed it takes some time to get the build dependencies (C++ cough) as well as to do the build.

In the Debian packaging case its easy to create minimal dependencies thanks to pbuilder and ensure the binary package contains only the right files. See debian nghttp2

For docker, since you work with containers it's harder to see what changed, but you still really want the containers as small as possible since you have to download them to run the app, as well as the disk use. While doing this I kept seeing huge images (480 MB), way larger than the base image I was using (123 MB) and it didn't make sense since I was just packaging a few binaries with some small files, plus their dependencies. My estimate was that it should be way less than 100 MB delta.

I poured over multiple blog posts about Docker images and how to make them small. I even looked at some of the squashing commands like docker-squash that involved import and export, but those seemed not quite the right approach.

It took me a while to really understand that each Dockerfile command creates a new container with the deltas. So when you see all those downloaded layers in a docker pull of an image, it sometimes is a lot of data which is mostly unused.

So if you want to make it small, you need to make each Dockerfile command touch the smallest amount of files and use a standard image, so most people do not have to download your custom l33t base.

It doesn't matter if you rm -rf the files in a later command; they continue exist in some intermediate layer container.

So: prepare configure, build, make install and cleanup in one RUN command if you can. If the lines get too long, put the steps in separate scripts and call them.

Lots of Docker images are based on Debian images because they are a small and practical base. The debian:jessie image is smaller than the Ubuntu (and CentOS) images. I haven't checked out the fancy 'cloud' images too much: Ubuntu Cloud Images, Snappy Ubuntu Core, Project Atomic, ...

In a Dockerfile building from some downloaded package, you generally need wget or curl and maybe git. When you install, for example curl and ca-certificates to get TLS/SSL certificates, it pulls in a lot of extra packages, such as openssl in the standard Debian curl build.

You are pretty unlikely to need curl or git after the build stage of your package. So if you don't need them, you could - and you should - remove them, but that's one of the tricky parts.

If $BUILD_PACKAGES contains the list of build dependency packages such as e.g. libxml2-dev and so on, you would think that this would get you back to the start state:

$ apt-get install -y $BUILD_PACKAGES
$ apt-get remove -y $BUILD_PACKAGES

However this isn't enough; you missed out those dependencies that got automatically installed and their dependencies.

You could try

$ apt-get autoremove -y

but that also doesn't grab them all. It's not clear why to me at this point. What you actually need is to remove all autoadded packages, which you can find with apt-mark showauto

So what you really need is

$ AUTO_ADDED_PACKAGES=`apt-mark showauto`
$ apt-get remove --purge -y $BUILD_PACKAGES $AUTO_ADDED_PACKAGES

I added --purge too since we don't need any config files in /etc for build packages we aren't using.

Having done that, you might have removed some runtime package dependencies of something you built. That's harder to automatically find, so you'll have to list and install those by hand

$ RUNTIME_PACKAGES="...."
$ apt-get install -y $RUNTIME_PACKAGES

Finally you need to cleanup apt which you should do with rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/* which is great and removes all the index files that apt-get update installed. This is in many best practice documents and example Dockerfiles.

You could add apt-get clean which removes any cached downloaded packages, but that's not needed in the official Docker images of debian and ubuntu since the cached package archive feature is disabled.

Finally don't forget to delete your build tree and do it in the same RUN that you did a compile, so the tree never creates a new container. This might not make sense for some languages where you work from inside the extracted tree; but why not delete the src dirs? Definitely delete the tarball!

This is the delta for what I was working on with dajobe/nghttpx.

479.7 MB  separate prepare, build, cleanup 3x RUNs
186.8 MB  prepare, build and cleanup in one RUN
149.8 MB  after using apt-mark showauto in cleanup

You can use docker history IMAGE to see the detailed horror (edited for width):

...    /bin/sh -c /build/cleanup-nghttp2.sh && rm -r   7.595 MB
...    /bin/sh -c cd /build/nghttp2 && make install    76.92 MB
...    /bin/sh -c /build/prepare-nghttp2.sh            272.4 MB

and the smallest version:

...    /bin/sh -c /build/prepare-nghttp2.sh &&         27.05 MB

The massive difference is the source tree and the 232 MB of build dependencies that apt-get pulls in. If you don't clean all that up before the end of the RUN you end up with a huge transient layer.

The final size of 149.8 MB compared to the 122.8 MB debian/jessie base image size is a delta of 27 MB which for a few servers, a client and their libraries sounds great! I probably could get it down a little more if I just installed the binaries. The runtime libraries I use are 5.9 MB.

You can see my work at github and in the Docker Hub

... and of course this HTTP/2 setup is used on this blog!

References

Posted at 21:00

April 16

W3C Data Activity: CSV on the Web: Seeking comments and implementations

The CSV on the Web Working Group has just published a new set of Working Drafts, which the group considers feature complete and implementable. The drafts are: Model for Tabular Data and Metadata on the Web – an abstract model … Continue reading

Posted at 19:42

April 15

Cambridge Semantics: Future of Text Analytics: A report from Text Analytics World

Richard_AU_1When I went to Text Analytics World in San Francisco earlier this month, I was struck at how many of the presenters, particularly consultants, ended their talks describing future directions of text analytics as something that sounded so familiar. They described what would be possible once there's advanced maturity in ontologies, the breaking down of siloes, entity and relationship resolution by multiple methods, and automated linking of it all together into semantic network models of knowledge: flexible exploration of the relevant. They made it sound like a bit of a stretch, almost pie in the sky, but what they briefly described as this destination was curiously similar to what was shown concretely in the last presentation of the conference, my own.

Posted at 17:00

Dydra: BGP Statement Pattern Counts

A recent developer mailing list inquiry caught our attention a few days ago. The author was wondering, “[can] anyone … give me a recommendation for ‘how big a sane query can get’?” He was wondering, “[can] anyone … give me a recommendation for ‘how big a sane query can get’?” His use case was to apply a SPARQL query against the LOD dataset in order to test for the presence of “patterns for human associations”. There was mention of subgraph sizes in excess of 400K triples, but as it were, his efforts appeared thwarted by much lower limits which his query processor set for the number of statement patterns in a BGP.

Posted at 14:06

Dydra: Support Issue Workflow

Where Dydra appears, in public, as a strictly remote service, the question occurs —

“If one cannot walk down the hall and knock on a door – or pound on a table, how does one get issues resolved in a timely manner?”

Any claims, that our response completion statistics are well over three nines notwithstanding, a better answer describes how we resolve those issues which do appear in a manner which ensures that 24/7 customer operations remain in service.

One aspect is a transparent process to record and track issues. The second is a well-defined response and resolution process.

Posted at 14:06

April 14

Leigh Dodds: Open data and diabetes

In December my daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. It was a pretty rough time.

Posted at 20:16

April 13

AKSW Group - University of Leipzig: AKSW Colloquium, 13-04-2015, Effective Caching Techniques for Accelerating Pattern Matching Queries

In this colloquium, Claus Stadler will present the paper Effective Caching Techniques for Accelerating Pattern Matching Queries by Arash Fard, Satya Manda, Lakshmish Ramaswamy, and John A. Miller.

Abstract: Using caching techniques to improve response time of queries is a proven approach in many contexts. However, it is not well explored for subgraph pattern matching queries, mainly because  of  subtleties  enforced  by  traditional  pattern  matching models.  Indeed,  efficient  caching  can  greatly  impact  the  query answering performance for massive graphs in any query engine whether  it  is  centralized  or  distributed.  This  paper  investigates the capabilities of the newly introduced pattern matching models in graph simulation family for this purpose. We propose a novel caching technique, and show how the results of a query can be used to answer the new similar queries according to the similarity measure  that  is  introduced.  Using  large  real-world  graphs,  we experimentally verify the efficiency of the proposed technique in answering subgraph pattern matching queries

Link to PDF

Posted at 09:51

April 12

Bob DuCharme: Running Spark GraphX algorithms on Library of Congress subject heading SKOS

Well, one algorithm, but a very cool one.

Posted at 14:55

April 10

Libby Miller: Walls Have Eyes goes to the Design Museum

We made this initially as a post for a presentation at work, but it doesn’t seem quite right for a work blogpost (though we will do one for that too) but it seems a shame for it not to be public.

The context is

Posted at 16:07

Egon Willighagen:

Posted at 13:21

Semantic Web Company (Austria): Thoughts on KOS (Part1): Getting to grips with “semantic” interoperability

Enabling and managing interoperability at the data and the service level is one of the strategic key issues in networked knowledge organization systems (KOSs) and a growing issue in effective data management. But why do we need “semantic” interoperability and how can we achieve it?

Interoperability vs. Integration

The concept of (data) interoperability can best be understood in contrast to (data) integration. While integration refers to a process, where formerly distinct data sources and their representation models are being merged into one newly consolidated data source, the concept of interoperability is defined by a structural separation of knowledge sources and their representation models, but that allows connectivity and interactivity between these sources by deliberately defined overlaps in the representation model. Under circumstances of interoperability data sources are being designed to provide interfaces for connectivity to share and integrate data on top of a common data model, while leaving the original principles of data and knowledge representation intact. Thus, interoperability is an efficient means to improve and ease integration of data and knowledge sources.

Three levels of interoperability

When designing interoperable KOSs it is important to distinguish between structural, syntactic and semantic interoperability (Galinski 2006):

  • Structural interoperability is achieved by representing metadata using a shared data model like the Dublin Core Abstraction Model or RDF (Resource Description Framework).
  • Syntactic interoperability if achieved by serializing data in a shared mark-up language like XML, Turtle or N3.
  • Semantic interoperability is achieved by using a shared terminology or controlled vocabulary to label and classify metadata terms and relations.

Given the fact that metadata standards carry a lot of intrinsic legacy, it is sometimes very difficult to achieve interoperability at all three levels mentioned above. Metadata formats and models are historically grown, they are most of the time a result of community decision processes, often highly formalized for specific functional purposes and most of the time deliberately rigid and difficult to change. Hence it is important to have a clear understanding and documentation of the application profile of a metadata format as a precondition for enabling interoperability at all three levels mentioned above. Semantic Web standards do a really good job in this respect!!

In the next post, we will take a look at various KOSs and how they differ with respect to expressivity, scope and target group.

Posted at 12:44

April 09

Semantic Web Company (Austria): Transforming music data into a PoolParty project

Goal

For the Nolde project it was requested to build a knowledge graph, containing detailed information about the austrian music scene: artists, bands and their music releases. We decided to use PoolParty, since theses entities should be accessible in an editorial workflow. More details about the implementation will be provided in a later blog post.

In the first round I want to share my experiences with the mapping of music data into SKOS. Obviously, LinkedBrainz was the perfect source to collect and transform such data since this is available as RDF/NTriples dumps and even providing a SPARQL endpoint! LinkedBrainz data is modeled using the Music Ontology.

E.g. you can select all mo:MusicArtists with relation to Austria.

SELECT query

I imported LinkedBrainz dump files and imported them into a triple store, together with DBpedia dumps.

With two CONSTRUCT queries, I was able to collect the required data and transform it into SKOS, into a PoolParty compatible format:

Construct Artists

CONSTRUCT Artists#1

Screen Shot 2015-04-10 at 10.53.36

Every matching MusicArtist results in a SKOS concept. The foaf:name is mapped to skos:prefLabel (in German).

As you can see, I used Custom Schema features to provide self-describing metadata on top of pure SKOS features: a MusicBrainz link, a MusicBrainz Id, DBpedia link, homepage…

In addition you can see in the query that also data from DBpedia was collected. In case a owl:sameAs relationship to DBpedia exists, a possible abstract is retrieved. When a DBpedia abstract is available it is mapped to skos:definition.

Construct Releases (mo:SignalGroups) with relations to Artists

Screen Shot 2015-04-10 at 10.59.50

Screen Shot 2015-04-10 at 11.00.10

Similar to the Artists, a matching SignalGroup results in a SKOS Concept. A skos:related relationship is defined between an Artist and his Releases.

Outcome

The SPARQL construct queries provided ttl files that could by imported directly into PoolParty, resulting in a project, containing nearly 1,000 Artists and 10,000 Releases:

PoolParty thesaurus

 

You can reach the knowledge graph by visting the publicly available Linked Data Frontend of PoolParty: http://nolde.poolparty.biz/AustrianMusicGraph

E.g. you can find out details and links about Peter Alexander or Conchita Wurst.

Posted at 08:37

April 07

AKSW Group - University of Leipzig: Special talk: Linked Data Quality Assessment and its Application to Societal Progress Measurement

Linked Data Quality Assessment and its Application to Societal Progress Measurement

Amrapali ZaveriAbstract: In recent years, the Linked Data (LD) paradigm has emerged as a simple mechanism for employing the Web as a medium for data and knowledge integration where both documents and data are linked. Many different communities on the Internet such as geographic, media, life sciences and government have already adopted these LD principles. In all these use cases utilizing LD, one crippling problem is the underlying data quality. Incomplete, inconsistent or inaccurate data affects the end results gravely, thus making them unreliable. Data quality is commonly conceived as fitness for use, be it for a certain application or use case.  A key challenge is to assess the quality of datasets published on the Web and make this quality information explicit. Assessing data quality is particularly a challenge in LD as the underlying data stems from a set of multiple, autonomous and evolving data sources. Moreover, the dynamic nature of LD makes assessing the quality crucial to measure the accuracy of representing the real-world data. In this thesis, we first unify 18 data quality dimensions and provide a total of 69 metrics for assessment of LD. Next, three different methodologies for linked data quality assessment are evaluated namely (i) user-driven; (ii) crowdsourcing and (iii) semi-atuomated use case driven. Finally, we take into account a domain-specific use case that consumes LD and leverages on data quality. We show the advantages of this semi-automated assessment over the other types of quality assessment methodologies discussed earlier. The Observatory aims at evaluating the impact of research development on the economic and healthcare performance of each country per year. We illustrate the usefulness of LD in this use case and the importance of quality assessment for any data analysis.

Join us!

  • Thursday, 9 April at 2pm, Room P702

Posted at 16:13

April 06

Norm Walsh: Gradle, etc.

A few thoughts on improving build processes.

Posted at 19:04

March 31

W3C Read Write Web Community Group: Read Write Web — Q1 Summary — 2015

Summary

2015 is to shaping up be the year that standards for reading and writing, and the web in general, start to be put together into, next generation, systems and applications.  Quite a comprehensive review post, contains much of what is being looked forward to.

The Spatial Data on the Web working group was announced and the EU funded Aligned project also kicked off.

Congratulations to the Linked Data Platform working group, who achieved REC status this quarter, after several years of hard work.  Having spent most of the last three month testing various implementations, I’m happy to say it has greatly exceeded my already high expectations.

Communications and Outreach

A number of read write web standards and apps were demoed at the W3C Social Web Working group F2F, hosted by MIT.  This seems to have gone quite well and resulted in the coining of a new term “SoLiD” — Social Linked Data!  Apps based on the Linked Data Platform have been considered as part of the work of this group.

 

Community Group

A relatively quiet quarter in the community group, tho still around 60 posts on our mailing list.  There is much interest on the next round of work that will be done with the LDP working group.  Some work has been done on login and signup web components for WebID, websockets and a relaunch of WebIDRealm.

profileeditor

Applications

Lots of activity on the apps front.  Personally I’ve been working using GOLD, but for also announced was the release of Virtuoso 7.2 for those that like a feature rich enterprise solution.

Making use of the experimental pub sub work with websockets, I’ve started to work on a chat application.  A profile reader and editor allows you to create and change your profile.  I’ve continued to work on a decentralized virtual wallet and props goes out to timbl who in his vanishingly small amounts of spare time has been working on a scheduler app.

lr

Last but not Least…

For those of you that like the web, like documentation, like specs and like academic papers, all four have been wrapped into one neat package with the announcement of linked open research.  It’s a great way to document work and create templates for upstream delivery.  Hover over the menu in the top right and see many more options.  I’m looking forward to using this to try to bridge the gap between the worlds of documentation, the web, and research.

Posted at 19:50

March 30

Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: DCMI Webinar: "From 0 to 60 on SPARQL queries in 50 minutes" (Redux)

2015-03-30, This webinar with Ethan Gruber on 13 May provides an introduction to SPARQL, a query language for RDF. Users will gain hands on experience crafting queries, starting simply, but evolving in complexity. These queries will focus on coinage data in the SPARQL endpoint hosted by http://nomisma.org: numismatic concepts defined in a SKOS-based thesaurus and physical specimens from three major museum collections (American Numismatic Society, British Museum, and Münzkabinett of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin) linked to these concepts. Results generated from these queries in the form of CSV may be imported directly into Google Fusion Tables for immediate visualization in the form of charts and maps. Additional information and free registration is available at http://dublincore.org/resources/training/#2015gruber. Redux: This webinar was first presented as a training session in the LODLAM Training Day at SemTech2014.

Posted at 23:59

Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: National Diet Library of Japan publishes translations of key DCMI specifications

2015-03-30, DCMI is please to announce that the National Diet Library, the sole national library in Japan, has translated the DCMI Metadata Terms and the Singapore Framework for Dublin Core Application Profiles into Japanese. The links to the new Japanese translations, as well as others are available on the DCMI Documents Translation page at http://dublincore.org/resources/translations/index.shtml.

Posted at 23:59

: Linked Data Platform WG Open Meeting

A special open meeting of the W3C Linked Data Platform (LDP) Working Group to discuss potential future work for the group. The deliverable from the workshop will be a report that the LDP WG will take into consideration as it plans its way forward.

LDP offers an alternative vision to data lockdown, providing a clean separation between software and data, so access to the data is simple and always available. If you run a business, using LDP means your vital data isn’t locked out of your reach anymore. Instead, every LDP data server can be accessed using a standard RESTful API, and every LDP-based application can be integrated. If you develop software, LDP gives you a chance to focus on delivering value while respecting your customer’s overall needs. If you are an end user, LDP software promises to give you choice and freedom in the new online world.

So how will this vision become reality? LDP 1.0 has recently become a W3C Recommendation, but there’s still a lot of work to do. Come join the conversation about where we are and what happens next, on April 21st in San Francisco.

See the event wiki page for details.

Posted at 19:48

W3C Data Activity: Linked Data Platform WG Open Meeting

A special open meeting of the W3C Linked Data Platform (LDP) Working Group to discuss potential future work for the group. The deliverable from the workshop will be a report that the LDP WG will take into consideration as it … Continue reading

Posted at 17:48

March 29

Libby Miller: A little stepper motor

I want to make a rotating 3D-printed head-on-a-spring for my

Posted at 19:08

Bob DuCharme: Spark and SPARQL; RDF Graphs and GraphX

Some interesting possibilities for working together.

Posted at 17:24

March 24

AKSW Group - University of Leipzig: Two AKSW Papers at ESWC 2015

We are very pleased to announce that two of our papers were accepted for presentation as full research papers at ESWC 2015.

Automating RDF Dataset Transformation and Enrichment (Mohamed Ahmed Sherif, Axel-Cyrille Ngonga Ngomo, and Jens Lehmann)

With the adoption of RDF across several domains, come growing requirements pertaining to the completeness and quality of RDF datasets. Currently, this problem is most commonly addressed by manually devising means of enriching an input dataset. The few tools that aim at supporting this endeavour usually focus on supporting the manual definition of enrichment pipelines. In this paper, we present a supervised learning approach based on a refinement operator for enriching RDF datasets. We show how we can use exemplary descriptions of enriched resources to generate accurate enrichment pipelines. We evaluate our approach against eight manually defined enrichment pipelines and show that our approach can learn accurate pipelines even when provided with a small number of training examples.

HAWK – Hybrid Question Answering using Linked Data (Ricardo Usbeck, Axel-Cyrille Ngonga Ngomo, Lorenz Bühmann, and Christina Unger)

The decentral architecture behind the Web has led to pieces of information being distributed across data sources with varying structure. Hence, answering complex questions often required combining information from structured and unstructured data sources. We present HAWK, a novel entity search approach for Hybrid Question Answering based on combining Linked Data and textual data. The approach uses predicate-argument representations of questions to derive equivalent combinations of SPARQL query fragments and text queries. These are executed so as to integrate the results of the text queries into SPARQL and thus generate a formal interpretation of the query. We present a thorough evaluation of the framework, including an analysis of the influence of entity annotation tools on the generation process of the hybrid queries and a study of the overall accuracy of the system. Our results show that HAWK achieves 0.68 respectively 0.61 F-measure within the training respectively test phases on the Question Answering over Linked Data (QALD-4) hybrid query benchmark.

Come over to ESWC and enjoy the talks.

Best regards,

Sherif on behalf of AKSW

Posted at 12:38

March 23

AKSW Group - University of Leipzig: AKSW Colloquium, 03-23-2015, Query Tree Learner and From CPU bringup to IBM Watson

From CPU bring up to IBM Watson by Kay Müller, visiting researcher, IBM Ireland

Kay Müller

Working in a corporate environment like IBM offers many different opportunities to work on the bleeding edge of research and development. In this presentation Kay Müller, who is currently a Software Engineer in the IBM Watson Group, is going to give a brief overview of some of the projects he has been working on in IBM. These projects range from a CPU bring up using VHDL to the design and development of a semantic search framework for the IBM Watson system.

Git Triple Store by Natanael Arndt

Natanael ArndtIn a setup of distributed clients resp. applications with different actors writing on the same knowledge base (KB) you need Synchronization of distributed copies of the KB, an edit history with provenance information and a management for different versions of the KB in parallel. The aim is to design and construct a Triple Store back end which records any change on Triple level and enables distributed curation of RDF-graphs. This should be achieved by using a distributed revision control system for holding a serialization of the RDF-graph.

Today I will present the paper “R&Wbase: Git for triples” by Miel Vander Sande et al. published at LDOW2013 as related work. Additionally I will present my ideas towards a colaboration infrastructure for a DVCS for triples.

 

About the AKSW Colloquium

This event is part of a series of events about Semantic Web technology. Please see http://wiki.aksw.org/Colloquium for further information about previous and future events. As always, Bachelor and Master students are able to get points for attendance and there is complimentary coffee and cake after the session.

 

Posted at 09:58

AKSW Group - University of Leipzig: AKSW Colloquium, 03-23-2015, Git Triple Store and From CPU bringup to IBM Watson

From CPU bring up to IBM Watson by Kay Müller, visiting researcher, IBM Ireland

Kay Müller

Working in a corporate environment like IBM offers many different opportunities to work on the bleeding edge of research and development. In this presentation Kay Müller, who is currently a Software Engineer in the IBM Watson Group, is going to give a brief overview of some of the projects he has been working on in IBM. These projects range from a CPU bring up using VHDL to the design and development of a semantic search framework for the IBM Watson system.

Git Triple Store by Natanael Arndt

Natanael Arndt

In a setup of distributed clients resp. applications with different actors writing on the same knowledge base (KB) a synchronization of distributed copies of the KB, an edit history with provenance information and a management for different versions of the KB in parallel are needed. The aim is to design and construct a Triple Store back end which records any change on triple-level and enables distributed curation of RDF-graphs. This should be achieved by using a distributed revision control system for holding a serialization of the RDF-graph. Natanael Arndt will present the paper “R&Wbase: Git for triples” by Miel Vander Sande et al. published at LDOW2013 as related work. Additionally, he will present his ideas towards a colaboration infrastructure using distributed version control systems for triples.

 

About the AKSW Colloquium

This event is part of a series of events about Semantic Web technology. Please see http://wiki.aksw.org/Colloquium for further information about previous and future events. As always, Bachelor and Master students are able to get points for attendance and there is complimentary coffee and cake after the session.

 

Posted at 09:58

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